History of Nunavut

Nunavut, meaning “Our land” in Inuktitut, is the newest of Canada’s 3 territories. Nunavut came into being on April 1, 1999 as a result of the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement. It is the largest of the three territories occupying 1/5th of Canada’s land mass or 2,093,190 sq. km. Nunavut is divided into 3 regions; Kitikmeot, Kivalliq, Baffin. Iqaluit is the capital and largest of the 26 communities that make up Nunavut. Originally named Frobisher Bay Iqaluit is located on Baffin Island the fifth largest island in the world.

The Flag

Nunavut Flag

The blue and gold colours symbolize the riches of the land, sea and sky. The inuksuk is a symbol of the stone monuments that act as guides for people travelling on the land and also marks sacred and special places. The North Star is a traditional guide for navigation and is also symbolic of the leadership of elders in the community.

The Coat of Arms


The blue and gold colours symbolize the riches of the land, sea and sky. The inuksuk is a symbol of the stone monuments that act as guides for people travelling on the land and also marks sacred and special places. The qulliq (Inuit stone lamp) respresents light and the warmth of family and the community. The arc of fine gold circles refers to the life giving properties of the sun arching above and below the horizon. The North Star represents the traditional guide for navigation. The iglu represents the traditional life of the Inuit and means of survival. The Royal Crown symbolizes public government for all people of Nunavut and establishes Nunavut as a partner in Confederation. The caribou and narwhal represent land and sea animals which are a part of the natural heritage of Nunavut. The base represents land and sea and has 3 species of Arctic wild flowers. The motto in Inuktitut means “Nunavut, our strength”.